Blog

Today is #NationalPoetryDay

Photo by David Bartus on Pexels.com

I’ve chosen to #ShareAPoem by John Keats called To Autumn or Ode to Autumn.
Autumn is one of my favourite seasons and Keats poem really captures the essence of the season in his famous first line.

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness


Keats wrote it in September over 200 years ago when he was taking a walk in Winchester. It’s reflective tone is something I can relate to.  His vision is moving; especially if you consider that he was just 23 years old and never saw Autumn again in England as he moved away to Rome and died shortly after from tuberculosis.

To Autumn

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap’d furrow sound asleep,
Drows’d with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers;
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too –
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

If you want to read more about John Keats and other poems by him visit at the Poetry Archive website at https://poetryarchive.org/poet/john-keats/

Blog, Chronic illness, Fibromyalgia, Invisible illness

September is #Pain Awareness Month…

I have an illness that’s not visible.

Although you cannot see it

For me #fibromyalgia is real.

It causes me #chronic pain and #fatigue.

The pain can be debilitating and constant.

Some days it can get better or worse.

It’s altered my life choices

I’m not asking for sympathy

Just empathy

If you’ve never heard of fibromyalgia or know very little about it. Please take a few minutes to read this.

What is fibromyalgia?

Briefly, it affects the skeletal muscles throughout the body, causing varying degrees of pain.

The pain ranges in severity from day to day and it is affected by temperature,

stress

and the amount of physical activity carried out.

Fibromyalgia sufferers commonly experience a range of different types of pain.

The pain can range from a sharp stabbing pain,

an ache

and a burning pain.

Other symptoms that can be experienced are

fatigue,

poor sleep quality,

stiffness,

IBS,

headaches,

cognitive problems

“Fibro fog”,

depression,

dizziness,

anxiety

and painful periods.

Have a look at the NHS description of fibromyalgia for more in depth information about the condition.

Invisible Illness and Fibromyalgia 

One huge difficulty of living with fibromyalgia is it’s an invisible illness; others assume you are well because there is no physical evidence of being ill.

In my personal struggle with fibromyalgia this single fact has caused me the most stress over the 14 years I have had it.

You may ask, if you know someone or meet someone with fibromyalgia. What should I do?  Showing them compassion and learn about their symptoms can make a difference. Just taking the time to talk about it with them will help.

If you have just been diagnosed and are trying to find links to support groups and the online community. Have a look at the organisations below and also Facebook groups.

UK Fibromyalgia is a brilliant site that covers a wide range of information about fibromyalgia.

Also

Fibromyalgia Association  is a registered charity that provides information and help to sufferers.