Ancient woodland, Chronic illness, Fibromyalgia, Invisible illness, Trees, Uncategorised, Walking, Woodland

Just a walk…

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Bluebell Woods Photo by Nick

Now we are staying home, my one walk a day is more important that ever before.

I have to admit walking is something I hated, as a child. I remember having to go on walks and thinking, how much further, my legs will fall off in a minute!

So, what changed my opinion of walking?

I first started walking regularly before I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, about fifteen years ago. I’d been suffering with lower back pain and sciatica, which got progressively worse.  I was unable to work. My doctor said I need to go to physio first; to get the muscles and joints moving and when I’m mobile to start walking regularly.

At the time I thought it was really unhelpful advice as I could barely move, let alone walk anywhere!  But after a few painful physio sessions. I started with short bursts at first of 5 to 10 minutes, progressing to longer walks.  Now I do a regular walk every day and have not suffered from back pain so much; I also have more energy to do things.

I find my walk stimulating now; especially on a fine sunny day, it can really lift your mood.

Observing nature and seeing trees come into leaf as spring approaches is really refreshing.

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Bluebells Photo by Nick

I live near a park and I can vary my daily walks through wooded areas and quiet residential streets. I usually spend about 25-45 minutes on a walk and vary the terrain.

Being a fibromyalgia sufferer I notice any temperature drop as the weather changes, straight away. My joints feel stiff, I get more pain and all my symptoms get progressively worse. I still try to keep active if I can everyday by walking. I wear layers and thermals to keep warm.

I have a pair of waterproof walking boots; which are great to wear in heavy rain. I bought mine from a outdoor clothing and footwear shop in the winter sale. I’ve also invested in a waterproof jacket,  woolly hat, thermal gloves and socks.
I find it difficult keeping my hands and feet warm, when it is really cold. Research shows we loose most heat from our hands and feet; so it makes sense to keep these areas as warm as possible.

If you plan to begin walking and have not exercised recently it would be advisable to start slowly first. If your joints are very stiff it might help to try gentle exercises before you start to warm up the joints.

When you feel ready to start put on some comfortable shoes and suitable waterproof clothing for the weather.  Start off slowly with short bursts of 5 to 10 minutes and gradually build up from this.  You will find you get more confidence and can do longer distances.

For more information about walking and exercise have a look at the NHS Walking  guide. Check before setting out the latest update in your area, on staying safe during the Coronavirus pandemic.

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Blog, Cambridge, Nature, Walking

Walking around… Cambridge

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Cambridge Photo by Spiral White

I’m revisiting a previous post this week from before the pandemic, to Cambridge, England.

I discovered some quaint streets and alleyways on my way to Kings College.

What can I tell you about Cambridge?

It’s on the tourist map as one of the most visited places in Britain.

It’s  famous for its University Kings College, Chapel and Choir. On Christmas Eve every year a service of Nine lessons and Carols is broadcast.

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Cam River Photo by Spiral White 

The River Cam runs through Cambridge.

Students earn some extra cash by hiring out small boats called “punts”and punting visitors along the river.

On a summers day the river is a colourful mass of punts.

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The Backs, Cambridge Photo by Spiral White 

Walking into the town centre through “the backs” by the river.

A variety of Spring flowers cover the banks. First with snow drops, then daffodils and bluebells.

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As I reach the city centre Gothic architecture surrounds me.
For more information about Cambridge have a look at the Visit Britain website
Check before setting out local COVID restrictions.

Ancient woodland, Chronic illness, Fibromyalgia, Invisible illness, Trees, Uncategorised, Walking, Woodland

Just a walk…

Photo by gryffyn m on Pexels.com

Now we are staying home, my one walk a day is more important that ever before.

I have to admit walking is something I hated, as a child. I remember having to go on walks and thinking, how much further, my legs will fall off in a minute!

So, what changed my opinion of walking?

I first started walking regularly before I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, about fifteen years ago. I’d been suffering with lower back pain and sciatica, which got progressively worse.  I was unable to work. My doctor said I need to go to physio first; to get the muscles and joints moving and when I’m mobile to start walking regularly.

At the time I thought it was really unhelpful advice as I could barely move, let alone walk anywhere!  But after a few painful physio sessions. I started with short bursts at first of 5 to 10 minutes, progressing to longer walks.  Now I do a regular walk every day and have not suffered from back pain so much; I also have more energy to do things.

I find my walk stimulating now; especially on a fine sunny day, it can really lift your mood.

Observing nature and seeing trees come into leaf as spring approaches is really refreshing.

I live near a park and I can vary my daily walks through wooded areas and quiet residential streets. I usually spend about 25-45 minutes on a walk and vary the terrain.

Being a fibromyalgia sufferer I notice any temperature drop as the weather changes, straight away. My joints feel stiff, I get more pain and all my symptoms get progressively worse. I still try to keep active if I can everyday by walking. I wear layers and thermals to keep warm.

I have a pair of waterproof walking boots; which are great to wear in heavy rain. I bought mine from a outdoor clothing and footwear shop in the winter sale. I’ve also invested in a waterproof jacket,  woolly hat, thermal gloves and socks.
I find it difficult keeping my hands and feet warm, when it is really cold. Research shows we loose most heat from our hands and feet; so it makes sense to keep these areas as warm as possible.

If you plan to begin walking and have not exercised recently it would be advisable to start slowly first. If your joints are very stiff it might help to try gentle exercises before you start to warm up the joints.

When you feel ready to start put on some comfortable shoes and suitable waterproof clothing for the weather.  Start off slowly with short bursts of 5 to 10 minutes and gradually build up from this.  You will find you get more confidence and can do longer distances.

For more information about walking and exercise have a look at the NHS Walking  guide. Check before setting out the latest regulations in your area, on staying safe during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Calm, Exercise, Happiness, Music, Reading, Walking, Writing

Ways to Happiness…

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Are you looking for the ever elusive happiness?

How do you find it?  

Well, it’s there under the surface, very well hidden at the moment but if you delve deep you will find it.

Following on from my previous post about happiness I’m looking at possible ways to find it.

‘I think the best way to experience happiness is through a calm mind. Helping your mind to become calm and relaxed at the moment is not an easy task, but it is the best way to experience happiness.’

Five popular ways to calm the mind

1 Music

Listening to music can have a calming effect. Classical music is generally recommend to be better at helping concentration and mood, although other types of music are also good if you like listening to them. I tend to listen to particular radio programs because they give a good mix of thought provoking music and some chat which can move your day along.

2 Reading 

Reading a book is another way to find some calm in your day. Searching out an interesting book that will grip you and will get you instantly absorbed by the plot, can be really exciting. Your mind is transported off to another place and taken away from your worries. Check out books available online from your local library.📚 

3 Walking

Walking every day even if it’s for a few minutes can make a huge difference. I usually try to walk for about an hour a day; even on a cold day it’s really helpful. It can help to stimulate the brain to look at a world outside your four walls and experience natural surroundings. It’s also a great form of exercise for most people and it can help you keep fit.

4 Meditation 

Meditation can help to calm the mind and experience happiness in some form. I enjoy meditating as this gives me some form of relief from any anxiety I maybe feeling. My page Meditation and Mindfulness gives more tips.

5 Learning something new

Trying out a new skill like learning a language, or starting to learn painting in watercolours. I started learning french recently and have found I remember a lot from my school days. I have been able to use it to help me write poetry in french. A creative skill is a very useful tool and are great ways to be totally absorbed by something you enjoy doing.

I hope you’ve found my post helpful and can explore your own ways to happiness.